Long term digital lifestyle vision

26 02 2010

I love it when a plan comes together… or at least, I like to watch someone put a long term plan together and execute it – especially when I am along for the ride. 

I’ve been told that I’m too impatient when it comes to proposing and executing strategic organizational and product movement.  Perhaps that’s true.  Sometimes the wait is internal inertia, sometimes it is for technology to catch up with the science fiction, and sometimes it’s waiting for the market to emerge.

Seeing the market before it emerges is what differentiates revolutionary plans from incremental plans.  While revolutionary plans come together on the backs of incremental gains, those gains are shaped and directed by a vision.

Your digital lifestyle

OK, this is going to sound like an advertisement, but I’m looking at it from a strategic roadmap and product management perspective.  Also, I already have a lot of this stuff lying around, so I’d like to see it work!  Now, onward…

Whether you knew it or not, the first thing to make progress toward the “paperless” (or perhaps “virtual”) anything was your house.  The office has too much inertia and weighty processes holding it back to really embrace the digital vision wholeheartedly.  It will move that direction, but nowhere near as quickly as your own household. 

That’s largely because you choose your own digital destiny.  New sexy products become available rapidly and the adoption curve for certain new technology items is based both on peer pressure and the desire for shiny objects.  Because of this, your house is very likely more advanced than your office.

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Moving to Windows 7 while keeping one foot in the past

17 11 2009

I finally made the commitment to Windows 7 as my main OS on my tablet PC.  I’d been running it in a dual boot configuration for a while, but a few weeks ago, it was time to move on.  My Vista installation was over 2 years old and was starting to act unpredictably.

As with every fresh operating system installation, the pain of starting from scratch makes you swear to never let your machine get to its inevitable ugly state again.

Keeping that promise might be a little easier this time around though.  By using some cool virtualization technology, you can have the best of both worlds.

Easy transfer wizard

There are many discussions about how to make life a little bit easier when moving to Windows 7 by using the Microsoft Windows Easy Transfer wizard.  I discovered a few things that I didn’t know while using it and thought I should pass it along.

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Windows Home Server and the 12 hour undelete

6 10 2009

A thoroughly scary and disappointing thing happened to me this weekend that made me reevaluate my cavalier way of doing IT work at home (you know, where the data is actually important).

I admit I was over-confident about certain things.  Heck, the thing we were doing worked before, so why shouldn’t it work again?

Here are some of the lessons and quirks that I uncovered:

You’ve got 720 minutes

Windows Home Server (WHS) does some really great things.  It mirrors your files so that in case of most hardware failures, your content is safe.  It backs up your other computers so that you’ve got peace of mind when your computers start making funny noises… but what’s backing up your WHS box (I would link in JungleDisk here, but they just pulled their WHS backup beta until further notice)? 

What if you make a mistake (or something else does), and you lose some files?

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Windows copy and paste rants and raves

6 07 2009

Ever since Windows NT 4, I have had an issue with a very simple operation… copy and paste.  It may have existed prior to NT4, but that’s the OS where it started to matter to me.

It’s not something obvious like, resuming an interrupted transfer or having the progress bar be better integrated into the status of the files being copied (e.g. indicate they are in process or in queue so you don’t accidentally edit or delete them).

I can’t necessarily call this a bug, but it certainly is a pronounced behavior that exists today in Windows Vista and Windows 7.  It’s quite simple, and I’m going to talk about some of its effects. 

The steps to repeat the behavior are easy:

  • Multi-select several files (say file1.txt, file2.txt, and file3.txt)
  • Copy
  • Paste them into a new location

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ReadyBoost = nope?

1 06 2009

There’s a lot of press about Windows 7 these days, and while I’m looking forward to it, I thought I would share my experiences with a feature in Windows Vista that is also in Win7.

Back in its early beta phases, we were introduced to an interesting and promising feature called “ReadyBoost”.  It seemed like a great idea for IT departments and home users everywhere.

Simply put: you may eek out a bit more performance from your existing hardware by just plugging in a USB drive.

This is all due to the fact that flash memory access on the USB stick is faster than disk access to a swap file.  Vista uses that extra space to swap in chunks of information and help your forestall the inevitable memory upgrade you’ve been pondering for the past year.

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